Zulus (ZU)

Zulus in 2015

Zulus in 2015

Zulus are a wild group first encountered in 2009 at the far side of the Western riverbed, towards Pharside dam – wild except for the dominant male, Shaka Zulu. He was a former Lazuli and Hoppla male who had left the monitored population in September 2008. Habituation started in 2010, yet most animals remained too wild to mark and thus distinguish them. Only one, the dominant female, could be recognized from the start due to the fact that she has eight instead of six nipples. Her name was thus Ocho Niple. Habituation seemed to suffer a severe setback when Shaka Zulu succumbed to a snake bite in May 2013 – however, in September six Lazuli males displaced seven Zulus males, boosting habituation levels immediately. Male dominance eventually settled on Cagliostro. The remaining females were by now quite well habituated, apart from dominant Ocho Niple who remained wary of humans. December 2015 saw just another split of the large group; Ocho’s splinter went missing, so Cagliostros part was followed but they disintegrated in early 2016, and remaining members spread across the population. Ocho Niple was never seen again, and she is assumed dead. Four Zulus females, of both splinters, managed to attract males of Lazuli and Quintessentials origin and they are now considered the Zulus group, yet the males were soon supplanted by wild males. Poma has emerged as the dominant female of the renewed group.

In the past year the Zulus have come closer to the other groups, so encounters with Quintessentials, Baobab or Nematoads are now occasionally observed.

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